Are You in a Life-Sucking Day Job That You Hate? 5 Steps You Must Take Right Now to Get the Heck Out of There!

Who is Driving Your Career“If you don’t know where you are going, any road will get you there.” 

– Author Lewis Carroll

It’s estimated that 90% of our daily lives is spent doing routine tasks. Now, this can be detrimental to your career success depending on what type of activities you’re engaging in on a daily basis. Why? Simply put, habit can be a bad thing, because “if you keep on doing what you’ve always done, you’re going to keep on getting what you’ve always got!”

I’ve noticed a common problem that many of my clients shared before coming to me for help, so I figured that I’ll help others address this problem by sharing a few nuggets from my Courageous Job Seeker Success System (TM).

Whether you want to change jobs — or careers — in the next 3- months, or simply get more out of your current job, a career plan is essential to helping you reach your goals.

This exercise may take you 20-30 minutes, or you might devote a few hours to planning where you want to be in the next 3-6 months. If you want your life to be different in 2014, especially your career, take the time to work on your career success discovery journey.

Action Step 1: Take Stock

The first step is to assess where you are. To figure out where you’re going, you must first look at where you’ve been.

Here are some questions to help you assess where you are:

*  What are you most proud of last year — personally, and professionally?

*  What went right last year and this year thus far?

*  Did you receive any awards or recognition last year or within these last few months?

*  Did you take on any additional responsibility last year or within these last few months? If so, what?

*  How did you take initiative in your job last year or within these last few months?

* Have you learned any new skills?

*  Did you earn any certifications or licenses?

Record this information in a success journal. This can be a Microsoft Word file on your computer, a note in Evernote, a series of emails you send to yourself (be sure to use email tags so you’re able to find the emails again!), or even a physical notebook. TIP: If you haven’t been doing this, it’s never too late to start recording your accomplishments as you go through this year. Don’t wait until the end of the year, or else this task will seem rather daunting.

Next, look at opportunities for improvement in your career. Ask yourself these questions:

* How does your salary stack up against your peers?

* Is your current position in alignment with your priorities and your core values?

* Where is change needed?

Action Step 2: Articulate Your Goal

Decide what you want. Spell it out: What does it look like; what does it feel like? You have to really want it to invest the time and energy to follow your dream. Describe your ideal job:

  • What is your ideal employer? (size, industry, culture, location, structure)
  • How much would your dream job pay? (Realistically) What are the most important benefits — other than salary — that would prompt you to go to work for a new company?
  • Describe your ideal job — the position you would most like to have. What is the job title, responsibilities, who you would report to, who would report to you. Would it involve travel?
  • Do you want to work independently, as part of a team, or both?
  • Do you like short-term projects or long-term projects?
  • What do you want your next job to do for you that your last job didn’t do? In other words, what will be different about your next job? Is there anything that you do in your current job that you don’t want to do in your next job?

Think about the person that you want to be, and imagine the possibilities. Then, identify 2-3 goals you want to tackle. Use the S.M.A.R.T. goal system to articulate your goals — goals should be “Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic, and Time-Oriented.”

For example, let’s imagine you have worked as a Marketing Manager for the past three years, but you really want more responsibility to manage a larger team and a larger territory. Your goal might be: “By August 1, 2014, I will be working as a Sales & Marketing Director in a Fortune 1000 company”

You should also write down why you are interested in making the change. In other words, what is your motivation for taking this path? Another good question to ask yourself is, “How will I know when I’ve achieved my goal(s)?”

Action Step 3: Make a Plan

Take time to prepare a game plan for how you will reach your goal. But don’t use planning as an excuse to procrastinate. TIP: You’ll want to get to Step 4 as quickly as possible, because actions create momentum.

Take each of your goals and write down the list of steps under each of them that you will need to take to make the goal happen. The more individual steps you can map out, the easier it will be for you to reach your goals. The steps should be practical tasks that will lead you to achieve the goal.

For example, with our goal of climbing up the career ladder from a Sales & Marketing Manager to Sales & Marketing Director, in a Fortune 1000 company”  Here are some sample steps:

  • Research job postings for entry-level marketing jobs. What are the skills, education, and experience required?
  • Join the American Marketing Association and attend one virtual event or in-person boot camp in the next 90-120 days.
  • Enroll in semester-long online marketing course focusing on marketing principles.
    Identify a volunteer opportunity to put marketing skills into practice — either in current job or with a community organization.
  • Assess transferable skills from accounting that would be useful in marketing role (project management, analysis, financial management, client relations).
  • Work with a certified professional resume writer to create a targeted marketing career kit which may include (value proposition letter, resume, validation portfolio, SEO linkedin profile, SEO resume website).
  • Join 3 marketing-related groups on LinkedIn, and follow 5-6 Fortune 1000 companies in the area that have company profiles on LinkedIn.
  • Assemble people in network to act as references for marketing interview.
    Connect with 2-3 contacts at Fortune 1000 companies in the area.

Give yourself milestones so you can measure your progress. How will you know when you’re on the right track? Include specific dates and numbers in your milestones.

Action Step 4: Take Action

With the tasks you’ve outlined in Step Three, this gives you a checklist of items to use to take action. If you are working through the steps and discover you need to add additional items, update your task list. You may also discover additional projects that need to be completed to make the next step — and the overall goal — easier to accomplish. You may also find that you need to make adjustments to your timeline.

For example, if you discover that a 3-month program to learn about social media would help you land your new leadership role in the marketing world, then you might adjust your goal deadline to a later date. This would give you time to put some of the new skills into practice before you put them on your resume.

As you work your way through your task list, focus on the actions you are taking, realizing that if you are taking the right actions, these should eventually lead to the results you seek. If you’re not getting the results you want, change the plan, not the goal. Re-examine your tasks and see if there is something you are missing.

It can also be helpful to get outside feedback. Enlisting the help of an accountability partner — a friend, family member, certified career coach, or certified professional resume writer — can provide valuable perspective on your progress. This individual can also keep you on track, making sure you are working through your task list. And if there is a specific area where you need help in order to cross the task off your list, make sure you ask for assistance.

For example, writing a resume to support a career move can be difficult. Enlisting the help of an expert can help you cross that task off your list.

Action Step 5: Measure Your Progress

When you’re on a journey, it can help to periodically assess where you are to make sure you’re on the right road. If you miss a step along the way — or take a “wrong turn” — you can find yourself a long way from your intended destination. So plan periodic assessments of your progress along the way. This can be a monthly “check-up” where you review your plan and make any necessary changes, or a quarterly review.

Taking the time to think through — and plan out — your career success discovery journey is an important step in helping you create the career you want for yourself. If you don’t, you may find your career stuck or stalled. Or what’s worse, you may wake up 5 years from now and wonder, “How did I get here?” If you want to achieve more in your professional life, invest the time and effort in completing these 5 steps starting right now. You can download a career success discovery journey by entering your details to the top right hand corner of this page.

You are more than welcome to share this article. When you do, please include this complete blurb below with it:

“Would you like to learn how to quickly and easily get more interviews, shorten your job search and increase your salary? Check out this website www.leezabyers.com for free articles, free resources and to check your Career Conqueror Quotient (CCQ). Leeza Byers is a Job-Search Strategy Coach, Author, Motivational Speaker, Internationally Certified Career Management Coach, and an Award-Winning Internationally Certified Resume Writer.”

Leeza Byers, who’s also known as “The Rapid Employment Expert,” is the creator of the COURAGEOUS JOB SEEKER SUCCESS SYSTEM which gets job seekers employed in 5-8 weeks (some even do it in 3 weeks); which is less than half the national average of 39-54 weeks it takes to find a new job in today’s tough job market.

Want to make your next teleseminar or live event dynamic, memorable and inspiring? Contact Leeza at: Info@LeezaByers.com to find out how!

Leeza Byers, The Rapid Employment Expert | Info@LeezaByers.com |

Ph: 1-888-321- GET HIRED (4384)

How to Get Insider Information on Companies You’d Like to Work For

Insider Information

What if you could get “inside information” about a company you’re interested in working for, or about a specific job you’re applying for?

If you’re thinking about changing careers, talking to someone who does the job you’re interested in can give you insight into what you will — and will not — like about your desired job.

For someone who hasn’t interviewed for a job in a long time, an informational interview can also provide valuable practice before applying for jobs and going on interviews.

Informational interviews (also called information sessions, informational meetings, or research interviews) are interviews that are conducted to gather information to help prepare for a job interview and/or learn more about a specific job, industry, or company.

However, an informational interview is not a job interview, and should not be confused with one. With an informational interview, you’re not seeking a job — you are seeking information to help you get a job.

Anyone can conduct an informational interview! However, if done the wrong way, you can seriously hurt your chances of ever getting your foot in the door of your ideal company.

Informational interviews are not used as often as they should be by jobseekers, but they can be a valuable tool in your job search. There are 3 golden rules to follow when setting up and conducting informational interviews.

STEP 1: Choosing Who To Interview

When you’re seeking information about a job, company, or industry, there are a variety of sources that can provide you with these details. These can include:

Someone who is doing the job you want, but at a different company than you are thinking of applying to.

  • Someone who works in the industry you want to work in — but not necessarily doing the job you want to do.
  • Someone who works at the company you want to work at (so you can get an idea of company culture, benefits, and vacation policies, and to possibly get a referral to the person with the authority to hire you for your dream job).
  • A professor who teaches classes in your dream industry (so you can learn about what you need to do to prepare yourself to work in the industry).

STEP 2: How do You Find ‘Em?

  • Ask the people you know if they know someone who works in the job (or industry) you want to work in.
  • Contact your target industry’s trade associations and ask if there is a member (or members) who would be willing to talk to someone who is new to the field.
  • Contact your university’s alumni association and/or your former professors or the head of the department.
  • Use LinkedIn — conduct a search by job title or company and then either request a connection directly, or see who you know in common who could make the introduction. Also consider contacting people in a LinkedIn Group you’re a member of to see if they would meet with you.
  • Reach out to a recruiter in the industry. A recruiter who specializes in the industry will have great insights on industry potential, salary and benefit expectations, and who is hiring.

Make a list of people (and/or companies and job titles) you would like to conduct an informational interview with and start contacting them. Email is generally best for this.

Dear [Name]:

I was given your name by our mutual acquaintance, [Name], in the hopes that you would answer a few questions I have about working [in the __ industry, or at ___ company]. I would love to [speak with you by phone/meet with you for coffee] for [time period] at a [time/place] that is convenient for you. I am [just graduating from ___/looking to make a career change to __ industry], and your insights would be most helpful.

If you would be willing to [meet with me/talk with me by phone], please let me know a couple of times that will work for you to choose from. If you don’t have the time to [meet with me/talk with me] at this time, I understand.

Thank you.

[Your name]

TIP: Make sure you keep your email brief and to the point. Don’t include your whole life history. Remember, you are asking that person to do you a favor. Don’t waste their time. If you haven’t heard back after a week, it’s okay to send a follow-up email. If you don’t receive a response after the second email, move on to the next person on your list.

Now, you may be wondering: Why would someone agree to meet with you for an informational interview? Here are a few of the possible reasons:

  • To do a favor for someone. Being introduced by a mutual acquaintance is a great way to secure an informational interview.
  • To help others. Many people who have reached a significant career position enjoy “giving back.” Also, those who don’t want to mentor others may still take a one-hour meeting to share their expertise.
  • To receive recognition for their accomplishments. People love to talk about themselves — especially successes in their professional life.
  • To build their own network. Someone new to the field — or just out of school — provides a fresh perspective, which may help the interviewer do their job better.

STEP 3: What Not To Do In An Informational Interview

Don’t waste your interviewer’s time. Again, be sure that you’ve done your homework ahead of time so that you are not asking simple questions. This is your chance to get “inside information,” so take advantage of the opportunity!

Don’t forget that an interview is still a two-way dialogue. One common mistake in an informational interview is to treat it as an interrogation, instead of as a discussion. Even though you may have a limited amount of time to ask your questions, don’t cut the person off when you have the information you wanted from their answer. Recognize that you may not be able to ask all the questions you wanted to, but that there may be opportunities to ask additional questions in the future if you handle the informational interview well.

Ask if you can take notes during the interview, but don’t be so focused on your note-taking that you’re not engaged in the conversation. In most cases, the big picture is more important than the small details. But do jot down notes so you can fill in the details later.

TIP: The number one rule for informational interviews is that you do not ask for a job (or turn the informational interview into a sales pitch). An informational interview may lead to a job interview, but the quickest way to have your informational interview end abruptly is to direct your questions into how that person should hire you for the job you want.

Enlisting the help of others through informational interviews can be one of the best ways to move your job search forward and/or accomplish a career change. Having the right information will help you be more effective in your job search. Research and relationship-building — ultimately, leading to one or more informational interviews — can give you a significant advantage over other job applicants, and help you secure your dream job!

If you’d like to dive deeper and start charting your course to the path of success, feel free to contact us for an opportunity to enroll in our next Courageous Job Seeker Success Bootcamp (TM). You’ll gain access to actual phone and email scripts that other Courageous Job Seekers have used to land their ideal job fast!

You are more than welcome to share this article. When you do, please include this complete blurb below with it:

“Would you like to learn how to quickly and easily get more interviews, shorten your job search and increase your salary? Check out this website www.leezabyers.com for free articles, free resources and to check your Career Conqueror Quotient (CCQ). Leeza Byers is a Job-Search Strategy Coach, Author, Motivational Speaker, Internationally Certified Career Management Coach, and an Award-Winning Internationally Certified Resume Writer.”

Leeza Byers, who’s also known as “The Rapid Employment Expert,” is the creator of the COURAGEOUS JOB SEEKER SUCCESS BOOT CAMP™ which gets job seekers employed in 5-8 weeks (some even do it in 3 weeks); which is less than half the national average of 39-54 weeks it takes to find a new job in today’s tough job market.

Want to make your next teleseminar or live event dynamic, memorable and inspiring? Contact Leeza at: Info@LeezaByers.com to find out how!

Leeza Byers, The Rapid Employment Expert | Info@LeezaByers.com | Ph: 1-888-321- GET HIRED (4384)

The Hidden Job Market Exposed! How to Land a Job in Any Economy

hidden-job-market-iceberg2.jpg

I’ve had many job seekers ask me: “How do I get hired in such a highly competitive job market?” or another popular one is: “I’m not getting interviews, what do I need to do to secure interviews in this job market?”

Well, let me tell you a little secret that you may or may not have already heard about. It’s called the “hidden job market” and I’m going to show you how to use it to get hired quickly. What I’m about to share is actually some of the same stuff I utilize during my 1-on-1 coaching  sessions with my Courageous Job Seeker TM clients.

First, let’s dispense with a common misconception about the hidden job market. It  really isn’t hidden at all. It’s just not in plain sight. It’s referred to as the “hidden job market” because of how positions are created and filled. In most cases, jobs are created in1 of 3 ways. Either a(n):

  1. Company is growing and creates a new job;
  2. Employee quits, vacating an existing job; or
  3. Employee is fired from an existing job.

When a company is growing, the owner, president, or other hiring authority may know they need new employees, but have not initiated the hiring process as yet. They may not have the time, the budget, or the willingness to go through the hassle of advertising and interviewing. So, while the need is real, the job itself remains hidden inside the head of the hiring manager.

When someone quits or is fired, managers will first decide ifthey can eliminate the job, or combine it with another position. If they decide a new person is needed, they will first look inside their organization for someone to fill the role. If that does not work, they’ll likely ask employees for referrals and if that does not work, they may opt to run an advertisement through HR, or hire a headhunter-depending on the level of the postion that needs to be filled (Executive, mid-management, entry level, non-management professional etc. ).

In all of these cases, jobs remain hidden to the outside world for weeks if not months. Hence the term hidden job market.”

The only way for you to access the hidden job market successfully is to reach out to hiring managers directly before they opt to go the advertising or HR route. The hidden job market is your private laboratory to test the best methods for finding your dream job. Let me repeat this: The hidden job market is your private laboratory to test the best methods for finding your dream job!

Job Search Strategy 101: Do Targeted Research

One quick way to discover new opportunities is by doing structured search engine queries. And it’s fairly easy to do. Here’s how to do targeted research, in two easy steps:

Step #1 Develop a list of companies you want to work for

Here’s how you build that list. Before you start, you have to answer two questions: What job do you want? and Where do you want to do it? Tip: Use the Advanced Search option on Google.com.

Now, if you spend a few minutes experimenting with different combinations of search terms, you should turn up a nice list of potential employers who can hire you – your own private “hidden” job market.

Now, it’s on to …

Step #2 Find People Who Can Hire You

Once you have a target list of companies, you need to find out who the people are in those companies that can actually hire you.  A courageous job seeker would pick up the telephone, call and ask.

And for those you who may not be so inclined, here’s another way to get the names of hiring authorities.

Visit each company’s web site and look for names of people who can say yes. Who are you looking for? Executives, not human resource people – the latter group can only say NO … unless you’re another human resources professional. If you’re lucky, every corporate web site will identify its senior executives, including names, titles, phone numbers, career summaries and sometimes email and photos!  Web information should be up-to-date, but I would still call the receptionist to confirm it.

Once you have the name of the person one rung up the ladder from the job you want, you need to process their name through Google again.

This will produce a list of press releases, and news articles in which they are mentioned, as well as conferences they’ve attended. Read an article or two and clip something memorable to use in your Value Proposition letter (my clients know that I don’t call them cover letters), in which you demonstrate your knowledge of the person, the company, and how you can help both.

When you send your value proposition letter, you can to write. “I read your article in … about … which prompted me to write.” Very powerful, and a great way to get interviews.

A word of caution though, these strategies only work if you know you’ve got a stellar career marketing kit that truly conveys your strengths/skills and achievements. If this isn’t in your tool kit before embarking on your job search, then what I’ve shared above will only be futile, as you’ve only got ONE SHOT to impress a decision-maker/hiring manager.

If you’d like to dive deeper and start charting your course to the path of success, just register on the link located at the top of this page now, to gain access to your  FREE eCourse complete with handout now.

You are more than welcome to share this article. When you do, please include this complete blurb below with it:

“Would you like to learn how to quickly and easily get more interviews, shorten your job search and increase your salary? Check out this website www.leezabyers.com for free articles, free resources and to check your Career Conqueror Quotient (CCQ). Leeza Byers is a Job-Search Strategy Coach, Author, Motivational Speaker, Internationally Certified Career Management Coach, and an Award-Winning Internationally Certified Resume Writer.”

Leeza Byers, who’s also known as “The Rapid Employment Expert,” is the creator of the COURAGEOUS JOB SEEKER SUCCESS BOOT CAMP™ which gets job seekers employed in 5-8 weeks (some even do it in 3 weeks); which is less than half the national average of 39-54 weeks it takes to find a new job in today’s tough job market.

Want to make your next teleseminar or live event dynamic, memorable and inspiring? Contact Leeza at: Info@LeezaByers.com to find out how!

Leeza Byers, The Rapid Employment Expert | Info@LeezaByers.com |

Ph: 1-888-321- GET HIRED (4384)